The story of RAYON

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A lot of our products (you may have noticed) are made with rayon... we stock a number of STRETCH rayon products as well as fantastic light-as-a-feather Summer rayons! Our Kobomo home range is not only ethically sourced and handmade by our own team with lots of consideration and care for the prospective wearers; but also made with fantastically strong + economical material. Rayon, you may not know is a natural product, a fabric made from cellulosic fibres meaning they are NOT made from synthesised chemical compounds what-so-ever! 

The introduction of rayon and a number of other fabulous natural-based fabrics came about in the 1860's when production of silk slowed due to a disease that infected the silkworm population. The idea was to produce another natural based fabric that would hold similar characteristics to silk. While rayon has silk-like aesthetics with beautiful drape and feel, this fabric grabs and holds on superbly to bright, rich colours. It cellulose base gives it similar properties to other great natural fabrics like cotton, such as its breathability. Rayon is more moisture absorbant than cotton and many (including myself) would consider it a more comfortable fabric to wear than cotton. Rayon does not build up static electricity and is more resistant to pilling than a lot of its sister fabrics. 

Rayon is made from the cellulose of wood pulp (such as bamboo) or cotton. This natural base makes it a diverse fabric that offers great comfort and breathability. Today rayon is considered to be one of the most versatile and economical man-made fibres around because bamboo is one of the fastest growing plants and considered to be highly sustainable. And THIS is why we use it!... Also because it works perfectly with our designs and always falls beautifully over the female figure. 

 

You can read more about rayon at these sites:

http://www.britannica.com/topic/rayon-textile-fibre

http://www.swicofil.com/products/200viscose.html

http://www.patagonia.com/pdf/en_US/bamboo_rayon.pdf

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  • Sarah Dyer